Guided Visualizations

With the holiday countdown, Nutcracker performances, increased social engagements – stress levels can easily increase.  Dancers and dance teachers need recovery time and ways they can train (or retrain) their bodies into more efficient patterns.

I created a mp3 file of guided imagery for my students.  As I talk about in the Train Your Brain ebook for children – your brain doesn’t know the difference between what is real and what is imagined. I first learned about ideokinesis (using imagery to change neuromuscular pathways) from Irene Dowd and it has guided my rehab work with clients since then. In order to make a real physical change you have to go back to the cortical or brain level and change the message that is being sent out.

The focus of this mp3 file is to simply release all unnecessary tension and to increase your physical state of well-being. When you listen to it you can either be in constructive rest position which is lying on your back with your legs supported over pillows or on a chair – or sitting easily upright, supported comfortably in a chair. (note: it is 26 minutes)

I hope you’ll take a break over your busy week and click below to listen to this!

 

To your success,

Deborah

“Education is the key to injury prevention”

Balancing Tips!

Anneliese Burns Wilson was kind enough to talk to me about training for balance and why it is so important!  You can listen to the podcast by clicking here

Thanks to all who took the quick survey. I’m going to keep it open for a few more days and then I’ll send more information out by the end of this weekend.

Again….. click here to listen to the podcast on balancing!

Deborah

The dance is a poem of which each movement is a word. ~Mata Hari

Turnout and 5th position

Today’s blog entry is in podcast form. Here’s the question and then you can click on the highlighted link to hear my verbal response.

Hi! I have always have struggled with my turnout due to my bone structure. I have a few questions regarding my turnout and would LOVE to hear your advice. First, I have pretty good turnout when my legs are in the air especially in passe where I can have an 180 degree passe and still maintain good turnout on my standing leg. I do not have this turnout when my legs are in contact with the floor, such as in fifth position. Why? Second, I have always had to really work on my fifth position. I feel that my bum is sticking out and that I have too big of a curve in my lower spine. I do not tuck my pelvis only lengthen it downwards and I also pull my front up in addition to strengthening my lower abs. Why is my alignment not straighter? Lastly, when I stand in fifth position my hips always seem to twist into the barre even though I am holding my turnout in both legs. I know I will never have perfect turnout but would like to use what I have the best that I can. Thank you so much for your time. I bought “Tune Up Your Turnout” and thoroughly enjoyed reading it. Thank you so much!!! Katherine

click below for my response. Be patient – it’s a 7 minute response and might take a moment or two to load.

Click here

Enjoy!

The Science of Dance Training Podcast #1 is ready!

Happy Holidays!

After some trials and tribulations (the learning curve to technology is never easy) the first Science of Dance Training podcast is ready for your listening pleasure! The volume varies some (we’ll get that fixed for next time) but we are too excited to wait any longer to share this with you!

We’ve made it easy for you. All you are going to need to do is to click the link below and you will be taken to a page where the podcast is waiting for you to listen to online – or to save to your desktop or itunes to listen to later.


Click here

Here are the questions that we answered in the first podcast.

Question #1
Thank you so much for all you do to promote healthy ballet information for dancers of all ages. I have a question that I have not seen an answer to as of yet from a physiological perspective. Often, we parents have questions that we’d like to run by an impartial source rather than solely rely on our dance teachers’ answers.

As non-dancing parent of a young ballet dancer, aged 9, who would love to go to class 5 days a week if I would let her, how do I know how many hours of dance daily and weekly would be considered too much for her strong but still growing body?

I don’t want her to sustain injuries that she might not be aware of from dancing too much at a young age. She is studying under a teacher well-trained in the Cecchetti method and is taking mainly ballet classes and a jazz class for variety.

I’d appreciate any information you can provide. Thanks in advance.

Nicole

Question #2

Thank you so much for taking on this project. I applaud your innovative use of technology to reach this new generation of dancers (especially because incorrect information is so easy to find on the internet).

My question for the Science of Dance Training:

I’ve been told by dance teachers that a movement like a developpe or a grande battement starts from the hamstring muscles. I’ve also heard from athletic coaches that the hamstring does not control this movement, and that it is rather the quadricep. So, which is it? What exactly is the anatomy of a developpe or a grande battement?

Cross-training Confusion,
Tova

Question #3

Another suggestion applies to pointe. I know this is a delicate area, but I have several girls that I feel are ready to begin pointe work. Do you think the amount of hours of ballet in conjunction with body readiness are appropriate to assess readiness? Do you feel that an x-ray of their feet and ankles is necessary before commencing pointe work. Also, for prep-pointe, I would like the dancers to have pointe shoes to start working with them at the barre and breaking them in for 6-mos before they begin actual pointe work. Is this advisable? Dana

Question #4

I have three newer students with amazing flexibility, all three of whom are dealing with a snapping hip. It is getting painful, and doctors locally aren’t really sure what to do with them because it isn’t a flexibility issue. I am sure there are some exercises they should be doing to help strengthen, rather than lengthen, the iliopsoas, which they probably aren’t using properly due to the flexibility….I have a feeling they can cheat because the don’t need to work the joint as the rest of us do! What can I have them do to work that area for strength? And am I on the right track with that, or is there another reason for the snapping hip?
Tracy

Question #5

Thank you for providing this helpful information to all of us.

I have read a good portion of both of your publications, and seen many of the videos. The question I have has to do with the timing and order in which to introduce the exercises and stretches to a young dancer. It seems that they are often overwhelmed with what they are supposed to do. Instead of incorporating these great techniques into their routines before and during class, I see my own daughter reverting to the old ways, such as prone frogs, etc.

What is a good way to introduce these exercises so that they can actually remember what to do. Using a book or video is awkward during class.

And to make the sequence logical and easier for them to remember, and to incorporate into a routine, how do you suggest they start? For example, back, then hip, knee, ankle and foot?

I know your books suggest the routine to follow, but I ,myself, find it daunting to get my daughter to do the exercises as often as she needs to. I thought if there were a way to introduce, say 3 exercises at a time, then maybe she would be more compliant. But, I’m not really sure where to begin. She is “tight” in all areas!

Anyway, those are the issues we have which seem to be the major stumbling block to my daughters progress! This combined with a child’s natural timidity to be seen by her friends doing something new!

Thank you so much for the wonderful work you both are doing! I have learned so much from both of you!

Regards,
Nancy

Here’s that link again to click and be taken directly to the podcast!

Click here!

Have a wonderful holiday!
Deborah

“Education is the key to injury prevention”

Announcing The Science of Dance Training Podcasts!

We’re almost at the end of the year and Lisa Howell and I have been planning
some very special joint projects for next year. We are both passionate and
committed to educating dancers and teachers on how to get the most out of
your dancing. We’ve created a blog at TheScienceofDanceTraining.wordpress.com

We decided that we wanted to end this year on a very special note and are
going to be doing a free podcast that will be available online. We hope to
record the podcast before Christmas – and we need your help. We want you to
email possible questions that we can discuss in the podcast.

To celebrate our collaboration and to make it more fun – the six people who
get chosen to have their question answered in the podcast will get to
choose..

one of Lisa Howell’s dance education manuals, which include…

  • The Perfect Pointe Book and AV Course
  • The Front Splits Fast Flexibility Manual
  • The Advanced Foot Control Course
  • Core Stability for Dancers Manual

And you’ll be able to pick one of my products from The Body Series…

  • Tune Up Your Turnout book
  • Train Your Brain: A Teen’s Guide to Well Being Analyzing Arabesque DVD
  • Analyzing Turnout DVD The Standing Leg DVD
  • Ballwork: Releasing Muscular Tension DVD.

If you are interested in being one of our 6 winners this is what you’ll need
to do.

Go to thescienceofdancetraining.wordpress.com and submit your question.

You can also submit your question by sending an email to
thescienceofdancetraining@gmail.com

Send in more than one question, if you like, to increase your chances of
winning. Lisa and I hope to do a monthly free podcast as a way of saying –
thank you for being a part of our dance community.

Send your questions in quickly – we’ll be choosing the winning questions
this weekend – watch for another announcement saying the podcast is ready
for your listening pleasure!

Deborah

“Education is the key to injury prevention”